How five companies keep their remote workers rooted in the corporate culture

The ways that employees determine their level of job satisfaction are changing faster than many of us realize. As a culture, it’s not been that long ago that we’ve recognized the benefits of a healthy work culture on the bottom line – and now, with the love at first sight of the COVID pandemic, that healthy work culture needs to come to fruition. rooting and staying rooted for many employees. who have never set foot and may never set foot in your company’s headquarters. (Even the term “corporate headquarters” is starting to sound archaic.)

So how do people managers do it? What have they learned over the past year or so about managing a group that must function with the constant benefit of teamwork while remaining physically perhaps thousands of miles away from one of the other on the globe? No one has the magic bullet yet, and you can’t expect it. But people wait for this new normal to firm up before they can make their plans, and those plans are grounded in the new ideal (for many) of remote working. And here’s how five companies make it work.


When did your workforce become remote?

TKWW pivoted a full global remote workforce in early March 2020. While we have always been a flexible workplace in the majority of our departments, we have pivoted work setups, IT support and staffing. whole of our global community of employees towards virtual reality.

Can you share with us some ways that The Knot Worldwide manages to keep its culture at bay anchored in the true values ​​of the company? )

At TKWW, our values ​​guide all of our decisions and our employees truly live them every day, whether they spend the work day in person or remotely. Over the past year and a half, our core value of Winning Together has taken on new life as we collaborate from coast to coast. Our teams became even more united in each other’s professional and personal lives as we saw beyond the four walls of an office and into each other’s homes via Google Hangouts. Each year we nominate and recognize employees as part of our Core Value Awards, and last year’s winners have felt even more connected to our core values ​​as our teams have been fortunate to know employees who work at worldwide. The move to remote working has broken down barriers that typically exist in an office environment.

How is promoting culture at a distance a fundamentally different challenge from promoting culture in the office?

Our culture is something that makes working at TKWW so special. We believe our people make us a great place to work, whether they’re in the office or remotely. With that in mind, we’ve changed our communications strategy and provided transparent, proactive and encouraging updates to our global workforce to ensure every employee feels informed and understands how we plan to support our employees. We’ve also moved our entire workforce to Slack and really grew our remote community through a variety of events, programs, and offers. We often polled our employees to understand what their needs were, and we looked again at mental health and mindfulness, as we heard that burnout and screen fatigue is a major stressor. Remote working comes with its own challenges, but with an engaged workforce who are excited about the work they do and support each other, fostering a truly global community has been a highlight of this time.

Check Out Knot Worldwide Careers Page Here!


When did your workforce become remote?

We’ve come a long way, having made the decision in August 2020 to switch to permanent telecommuting, and the best iterations are yet to come. We launched a manual remote first, we are learning to move workflows to asynchronous and do our best to build in public as we join a thriving global community of remote organizations first. What we take are team-based feedback and member feedback and are rooted in our mandate to create a team member experience that makes distance first a major force in our culture.

Can you share with us some ways that Vistaprint manages to keep its culture at bay anchored in the true values ​​of the company?

In a remote environment first, virtual communication, project management and knowledge sharing tools give team members the ability to work together and get work done asynchronously, regardless of the location and time zone. Physical collaboration spaces will be available when needed for face-to-face interactions and in-person collaboration will remain an important part of how we work (and have fun) together.

How is promoting culture at a distance a fundamentally different challenge from promoting culture in the office?

The global nature of our team is already part of our culture, but collaboration across locations and time zones hasn’t always been effective. In an asynchronous working mode, your location is no longer an advantage or a disadvantage. Team members can respond to messages and consume information as it becomes available, with communication gaps between the two to accommodate non-linear workday and shifts depth and focus. This is made possible by the shift to a culture of “document everything” that makes the time zone irrelevant to the ability to collaborate, make decisions, share knowledge and learn.

Check Out Vistaprint’s Careers Page Here!


When did your workforce become remote?

Since the launch of Virbela in 2012, the team has worked in a flexible environment, with many team members working on hybrid schedules or entirely remotely. In March 2020, we leveraged our own technology to keep our distributed teams connected in virtual office spaces and grew from 20 to over 180 employees. Over the past year, we’ve helped dozens of businesses, schools and events thrive in a virtual environment using Virbela Virtual Worlds.

Can you share with us some ways in which you manage to keep your remote culture rooted in real corporate values?

Due to the increase in headcount over the past year, Virbela has set up social and diversity committees to ensure that all staff are represented and included. Virbela’s social committee plans monthly staff events such as quizzes, matches and parties to build relationships and keep colleagues in touch, and the diversity committee meets monthly to discuss initiatives Virbela’s D&I, hiring metrics and planning events focused on diversity. Virbela also organizes an annual staff culture retreat within the Virbela Open Campus with a focus on employee appreciation and open communication between management and teams.

How is promoting culture at a distance a fundamentally different challenge from promoting culture in the office?

Culture is changing to focus less on what happens in an office and more on what happens between people. Without the right tools, teleworkers can feel isolated and out of touch with their corporate culture. At Virbela, we create ever-active virtual communities that allow spontaneous connections between colleagues, an office space that allows us to pursue an open door policy and a fun environment where everyone is included.

Check out Virbela’s careers page here!


When did the Elsevier workforce become distant?

Between March and April 2020

Can you share with us some ways in which you manage to keep your remote culture rooted in real corporate values?

Elsevier is a global information and analysis company and our culture is rooted in science and health. For this reason, Elsevier recognized the severity of the coronavirus; and communicated the implications of a pandemic in January 2020. Our large employee base in China immediately migrated to working from home, and in March all staff were encouraged to work from home. Through it all, Elsevier took an empathetic and pragmatic approach to supporting its employees and customers and quickly leveraged technology to work from home.

How is promoting culture at a distance a fundamentally different challenge from promoting culture in the office?

Collaborations and agile teams worked even more closely to meet all the challenges. Employees were never embarrassed if a child interrupted a zoom meeting, but were applauded for handling this unprecedented situation. And being a science and health company, Elsevier employees have not only adapted, but joined the cause. Technologists and subject matter experts from across the business and around the world have come together to identify, organize and manage a new free coronavirus resource center that saw more than 200 million downloads in 2020. In some ways, this experience has strengthened our culture, strengthening the role we play in supporting the scientists, researchers, doctors and nurses on the front lines of the pandemic; reminding every employee that we have a role to play in this noble mission and this goal.

Check Out Elsevier’s Careers Page Here!


When did your workforce become remote?

Our organization has been developed from its roots as a unique and remote workforce in the world. As a result, we were well positioned for the pandemic well in advance and simply continued to operate as an entirely remote organization.

Can you share with us some ways in which you manage to keep your remote culture rooted in real corporate values?

Our organization, despite its global remoteness, communicates and coordinates itself openly and frequently. We see ourselves as a family and we support each other as such. We care deeply about each other and operate under the main principle of leaving no one behind. We have created a unique corporate culture rooted in love.

How is promoting culture at a distance a fundamentally different challenge from promoting culture in the office?

Unlike the office where everyone can see and interact with each other, coordinating in a remote virtual environment can present a different set of challenges. Despite these challenges, we have come together to converse freely with each other and have developed an open door, top-down mentality.

Check Out the VoteBash Careers Page Here!